Past winners and recipients

Thanks to the hard work of longtime ACES member and contributor Alex Cruden, the one who started this list of past winners and recipients of our contest prizes. The years are listed during which the work was done; each prize was announced in the following year.

Robinson Prize

2005 — Paul Soucy, USA Today

2006 — Tim Lynch, Los Angeles Times

2007 — Adam Smith, The Augusta Chronicle

2008 — Michael Roehrman, The Wichita Eagle

2009 — Beth Blair, Boy Scouts of America

2010 — Andy Angelo, The Grand Rapids (Mich.) Press

2011 — Kim Profant, Chicago Tribune

2012 — Doris Truong, Washington Post

2013 — Katharine O’Moore-Klopf

2014 — Larissa Newton

2015 — Sarah Grey

Glamann Award

2007 — Dow Jones Newspaper Fund

2008 — Merrill Perlman

2009 — University of Missouri’s Columbia School of Journalism

2010 — Bill Cloud, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2011 — William G. Connolly (actually a Lifetime Achievement Award)

2012 — Craig Silverman

2013-14 — Alex Cruden

2014-15 — Steve Buttry

2015-16 — Vicki Krueger

Headline prizes

2000

Division A (open) — Missy Prebula, Denton (Texas) Record-Chronicle

Division B (papers over 250,000 circulation) — Gina Nania, The Charlotte Observer; Joel Pisetzner, The Star-Ledger (Newark, N.J.); Jake Vest, Orlando Sentinel

Division C (125,000-250,000) — Don P. Brown, The Daily Oklahoman; honorable mention to Karen Yurconic, The Morning Call (Allentown, Pa.)

Division D (50,000-125,000) — Tom Wilk, Courier-Post (Cherry Hill, N.J.)

Division E (smaller) — no winner; honorable mention to Lisa McLendon, Denton Record-Chronicle

2001

Division A (hard news) — Martin D. Bennett, New York Daily News; honorable mention to Paul Lefton, Orlando Sentinel

Division B (papers over 250,000) — Bill Chronister, The Plain Dealer (Cleveland), and Michelle Maltais, Los Angeles Times; honorable mentions to Marc Olson, Los Angeles Times; Amy Richards, The Plain Dealer; Chris Zang, The Baltimore Sun, and Leila A. Merrill and Sarah Hanan, each of The Dallas Morning News; special citation to Martin D. Bennett, New York Daily News

Division C (midsize papers) — Pamela B. Nelson, The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.); honorable mentions to Nicole Villalpando, The Austin American-Statesman; Wendy Fawthrop, The Seattle Times; Linda H. Lamb, The State (Columbia, S.C.); Mark Murphy, Syracuse Post-Standard; Elizabeth Gelgud, The Charlotte Observer, and Matthew Crowley, Las Vegas Review-Journal

Division D (smaller papers) — Tom Paquin, The Leader-Telegram (Eau Claire, Wis.); honorable mentions to Brian Hershberg, Courier-Post (Cherry Hills, N.J.) and Susan McNally-Worrell, Skagit Valley Herald (Mount Vernon, Wash.)

Division E (student publications) — Mary Haley, Southern Connecticut State University

2002

Division A (hard news) — Judy Cramer, Los Angeles Times, and Susan Waggener, Lexington Herald-Leader; honorable mentions to David Breen, Orlando Sentinel, and Peggy Boss Barney, The Salt Lake Tribune

Division B (papers over 250,000) — Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times; honorable mentions to Ted Scala, The Plain Dealer (Cleveland); Chad Lorenz and Jennifer Balderama, each of The Washington Post; and Mike Davis, Betty Baboujon, and Samantha Bonar, each of the Los Angeles Times

Division C (papers 100,000-250,000) — Peter Donahue, The Providence Journal; honorable mentions to Sarah Lindner, The Austin American-Statesman; Peter Parisi, Washington Times, and Matthew Crowley, Las Vegas Review-Journal

Division D (papers under 100,000) — Michael Roehrman, The Wichita (Kan.) Eagle; honorable mentions to Tom Wilk, Courier-Post (Cherry Hill, N.J.); Debbie Sprong, The Elkhart (Ind.) Truth; Melissa Murdza, Stars and Stripes, and Tom Paquin, The Leader-Telegram (Eau Claire, Wis.)

Division E (student publications) — Mary Haley, Southern Connecticut State University

2003

Division I (papers over 100,000 circulation) — Jim Webster, St. Petersburg Times; award of excellence (honorable mention) to Sarah Lindner, The Austin American-Statesman

Division II (papers 50,000-100,000) — Vic Odegar, The Beaumont (Texas) Enterprise; honorable mention to Tim Murphy, The State Journal-Register (Springfield, Ill.)

Division III (papers under 50,000) — Matt Ochsner, Great Falls (Mont.) Tribune; honorable mention to Barbara Kerr Page, Albuquerque (N.M.) Tribune

Division IV (student publications) — no winner

Division V (staff category) — Los Angeles Times; honorable mention to the Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader

2004

Division I (papers over 250,000 circulation) — Liz Miniet, Atlanta Journal-Constitution; award of excellence (honorable mention) to Mark Chamberland, Denver Post

Division II (papers 100,000-250,000) — Drew McQuade, Philadelphia Daily News; award of excellence to Nicole Villalpando, The Austin American-Statesman

Division III (papers 50,000-100,000) — Steve Byers, The Huntsville (Ala.) Times

Division IV (papers under 50,000) — Dalton Tomlin, Denton (Texas) Record-Chronicle; award of excellence to Barbara Kerr Page, Albuquerque (N.M.) Tribune

Division V (staff category) — The New York Times; award of excellence, Tampa Tribune

Division VI (student publications) — Anna Holland, Iowa State Daily; award of excellence to Stephanie Miller, Columbia Missourian

2005

Division I (papers over 250,000) — Laura Dominick, Los Angeles Times; award of excellence (honorable mention) to Jim McNett, The (Portland) Oregonian

Division II (papers 100,000-250,000) — Peter Donahue, The Providence Journal; award of excellence to Joshua Beach, The Seattle Times

Division III (papers 50,000-100,000) — Steve Byers, The Huntsville (Ala.) Times; award of excellence to Jeff Verbus, The Repository (Canton, Ohio)

Division IV (papers under 50,000) — Tracy Cox, The Tuscaloosa (Ala.) News

Division V (staff category) — The News Tribune of Tacoma, Wash.; award of excellence to The Washington Post

Division VI (student publications) — Lauren Raab, The (UCLA) Daily Bruin; award of excellence to Zachary Dillon, The Daily Bruin

2006

Division I (papers over 250,000) — Rachel Dunn, Los Angeles Times; award of excellence (honorable mention) to Bill Walsh, The Washington Post

Division II (papers 100,000-250,000) — Peter Donahue, The Providence Journal; award of excellence to Rebecca Young, The News Tribune (Tacoma, Wash.)

Division III (papers 50,000-100,000) — Michael Roehrman, The Wichita (Kan.) Eagle

Division IV (papers under 50,000) — Jim Thomsen, Kitsap (Wash.) Sun; award of excellence to Barbara Kerr Page, Albuquerque (N.M.) Tribune

Division V (staff category) — Minneapolis Star Tribune; award of excellence to The New York Times

Division VI (student publications) — Lauren Raab, The (UCLA) Daily Bruin

2007

Division I (papers over 250,000) — Gregory Cowles, The New York Times

Division II (papers 100,000-250,000) — Matthew Crowley, Las Vegas Review-Journal; award of excellence (honorable mention) to Panfilo Garcia, The Austin American-Statesman

Division III (papers 50,000-100,000) — Michael Roehrman, The Wichita (Kan.) Eagle; award of excellence to Ashley Winchester, Connecticut Post

Division IV (papers under 50,000) — Gary Housey, West Paterson (N.J.) Herald News

Division V (staff category) — The New York Times; award of excellence to the Los Angeles Times

Division VI (student publications) — Katie Michael, University of Oregon, Daily Emerald; award of excellence to Audrey Kuo, UCLA, Daily Bruin

2008

Division I (papers over 250,000) — Jim Webster, St. Petersburg Times

Division II (papers 100,000-250,000) — Monica Cardenas, Austin American-Statesman; honorable mention to Peter Donahue, Providence Journal

Division III (papers 50,000-100,000) — Michael Roehrman, The Wichita (Kan.) Eagle; award of excellence to Tom Wilk, Cherry Hill (N.J.) Courier-Post

Division IV (papers under 50,000) — Niko Dugan, Champaign (Ill.) News-Gazette

Division V (staff category) — Los Angeles Times (Laura Dominick, Rachel Dunn, Amy Hubbard, Jennifer Karmon, Jim LaVally, Richard Nelson, Jessica Parks, David Shear, Ed Silver, Eldes Tran); award of excellence to the Cedar Rapids (Iowa) Gazette (Steve Buttry, Jeana Lewie, Rae Riebe, Scott Wingert)

Division VI (student publications) — Audrey Kuo, UCLA, Daily Bruin

 

2009

Division I (Individual): Circulations of more than 250,001, all non-newspaper entries

Winner: Laura Dominick, Los Angeles Times

Division II (Individual): Circulations between 100,001 and 250,000

Winner: Liam Miller, Orlando Sentinel
Honorable mention: Rich Mills, Omaha World-Herald

Division III (Individual): Circulations between 50,001 and 100,000

Winner: Scott Beckett, Corpus Christi Caller-Times
Honorable mention: Jolene Carpenter, Stars and Stripes

Division IV (Individual): Circulations of 50,000 or less

Winner: Trudi Shaffer, Connecticut Post
Honorable mention: Niko Dugan, Champaign (Ill.) News-Gazette

Division V: Staff entries from publications of any size

Winner: Los Angeles Times (submission A)

Division VI: All student publications

Winner: Amy Condon, Savannah College of Art and Design
Honorable mention: Tandy Versyp, Savannah College of Art and Design

 

2010 HEADLINE CONTEST FIRST PRIZES

CATEGORY 1: NEWSPAPERS

DIVISION A: Circulations of 240,001 and above

WINNER: Laura Dominick, Los Angeles Times

DIVISION B: Circulations between 160,001 and 240,000

WINNER: Randal Hunhoff, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

DIVISION C: Circulations between 80,001 and 160,000

WINNER: Chris Hanna, Austin American-Statesman

DIVISION D: Circulations of 80,000 and below

WINNER: Tom Meares, The Journal Gazette

CATEGORY 2: NON-NEWSPAPERS

WINNER: A.J. Baime, Playboy

CATEGORY 3: ONLINE

WINNER: Jill Reed, The Orange County Register

CATEGORY 4: STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

WINNER: Lauren Jow, Daily Bruin, UCLA

CATEGORY 5: STAFF ENTRIES

DIVISION A: Newspapers with circulations of 240,001 and above

WINNER: The Dallas Morning News, Portfolio A

DIVISION B: Newspapers between 160,001 and 240,000

WINNER: The Orange County Register

DIVISION C: Newspapers between 80,001 and 160,000

WINNER: Omaha World-Herald, Portfolio A

DIVISION D: Newspapers of 80,000 and below

WINNER: Politico

DIVISION E: Non-newspapers

WINNER: Signal Magazine

DIVISION F: Online

NO WINNER

DIVISION G: Student publications

WINNER: Daily Bruin, UCLA

 

2010 HEADLINE CONTEST RUNNERS-UP

CATEGORY 1: NEWSPAPERS

DIVISION A: Circulations of 240,001 and above

HONORABLE MENTION: Frank Christlieb, The Dallas Morning News

DIVISION D: Circulations of 80,000 and below

HONORABLE MENTION: Scott Beckett, Scripps Central Desk

CATEGORY 4: STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

HONORABLE MENTION: Frank Shyong, Daily Bruin, UCLA

CATEGORY 5: STAFF ENTRIES

DIVISION A: Newspapers with circulations of 240,001 and above

HONORABLE MENTION: Los Angeles Times, Portfolio A

 

————-2011————–

INDIVIDUALS

Category 1A: Newspapers with circulations above 240,001

 

First Place

David Bowman

Los Angeles Times

Comments: Bowman’s use of puns generally plays well here, giving the story’s gist without feeling too forced. His headlines showed finesse and humor on wide range of topics. He was able to masterfully work wordplay into tight counts without sacrificing clarity.

 

Second Place

Laura Dominick

Los Angeles Times

 

Third Place

Andy Webster

New York Times

 

Honorable Mention

Mike Davis

Los Angeles Times

 

 

Category 1B: Newspapers with circulations between 160,001 and 240,000

 

First Place

Dixie Land

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Comments: Totally ingrained and awesome; fun and engaging; “Exercism” captures the craziness of punishing workouts from both the viewpoint of the pain-seeking exercise enthusiast and the rest of us who are reading the paper on the couch, doughnut in hand.

 

Second Place

Matthew Crowley

Las Vegas Review-Journal

Portfolio B

Comments: Matthew clearly has fun writing headlines, and that translates into fun for the reader. The last-minute suspense of “Tick, tick, tick, tick … tax” was very effective, as was his literary twist with “Bags packed, engines hum, ready turkeys, here we come.”

 

Third Place

Pat Gilliland

The Oklahoman (Oklahoma City, Okla.)

Comments: These clever headlines strike a spot-on appropriate tone, inviting readers to travel into the articles. They are not forced and reflect a thoughtfulness for using the exact right word.

 

Honorable Mention

Joe Green

Newark Star-Ledger

 

Honorable Mention

Marianne Tamburro

Newark Star-Ledger

 

 

Category 1C: Newspapers with circulations between 80,001 and 160,000

 

First Place

Peter Donahue

Providence Journal

Comments: Smart headlines without resorting to cliches. Donohue uses lean, razor-sharp wordplay — “Twitter site,” “trunks” and “Windsor knot.”

 

Second Place

Nick Piastowski

Omaha World-Herald

Comments: “Cock-A-Doodle-Two” is the standout here, capturing with class and mirth the unusual accomplishment of the Gamecocks winning two consecutive College World Series titles. “Chomp” tells the sad tale of a disappointing loss without condemnation. These headlines are finely tuned works.

 

Third Place

Rich Mills

Omaha World-Herald

Comments: He mirrors the tone of the story and has a nice ear for language:

“Catch as kitsch can.” Clever, but not overly so.

 

Honorable Mention

Don Frost

Detroit News

Comments: Shows skill with the language, even in tight counts. “Cooler heads prevail in Army hat war” was a nice touch.

 

Honorable Mention

Jill Wilson

Winnipeg Free Press

Comments: Snazzy headlines to go with sharp layouts. “Loonie bin” is funny and dead-on, and “Polar Fleece” is appropriately hard-hitting.

 

 

Category 1D: Newspapers with circulations below 80,000

 

First Place

Michael Roehrman

Wichita Eagle

Comments: Solid word play that keeps a headline’s main mission — to inform the reader — in mind; headlines and art work together; headlines work on multiple levels. “Desperation is the only thing growing,” captures the emotion of the story with a nice turn of a phrase.

 

Second Place

Tom Meares

Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette (Fort Wayne, Ind.)

Comments: Meares’ humor shines through here. “Unpaid water bill douses old flame” is laugh-out-loud funny, as is the vaguely racy  “Story’s got world by the … ahem.” The head about the rising water and anxiety aptly conveys the growing sense of dread. Nice.

 

Third Place

Damen Clow

Scripps Newspapers

Portfolio B

Comments: Clow has a real ear for music. Sometimes, it’s pop music, as he leverages both boomer-era folk (Simon & Garfunkel) and ’80s kitsch-hop (Vanilla Ice.) Sometimes it’s the music of the language itself, which he uses for this portfolio’s strongest head, “Shiatsu for you shih tzu?” (see, even dogs need a massage). And the “hat’s all, folks” head delivers the beret story with a smile. Well done.

 

 

Category 2: Non-newspapers

 

First Place

James Tehrani

Workforce Management magazine

 

Second Place

Jim Sweeney

Signal magazine

 

 

Category 3: Online

 

First Place

Lion Calandra

FoxNews.com

 

Second Place

Rick Schindler

Today.com

 

 

Category 4: Students

 

First Place

Zack Aldrich

Columbia Missourian

Comments: The headlines here offer engaging word play that goes beyond the obvious and still communicates the news of each story.”Awaiting Game” especially is a sophisticated, clever headline, as were “No Garbage, Just Thrash” and “Suspension ≠ Vacation.” The writer did a great job of giving enough to pique the reader’s interest without giving away the whole story.

 

Second Place

Becca Clemons

Kentucky Kernel

Comments: Some real effort to craft headlines that are clever while still being accurate. These headlines are short and to the point but they also grab the reader’s attention.

 

Third Place

Jason Bennett

University Daily Kansan

Portfolio A

Comments: To continue the sports metaphor of the “turkey” hed, this portfolio hits for the home run. Good variety across subjects and witty without being strained.

 

Honorable Mention

Carlos Serrano

District (Savannah College of Art and Design)

Comments: This headline writer clearly knows how to use puns without going overboard.

 

 

STAFFS

 

Category 5A: Newspapers with circulations above 240,001

 

First Place

Dallas Morning News

Portfolio A

 

Comments: The judges were unanimous in naming this portfolio their favorite. The Dallas Morning News offers a selection of clever, punchy headlines that get right to the heart of the story. This portfolio includes a great combination of straightforward puns and some more-clever wordplay that rewards you when you figure it out. The display type also works nicely with accompanying photos, and the captions supplement the headlines for the full package.

 

Second Place

Los Angeles Times

Portfolio A

 

Third Place

New York Times

Portfolio A

 

Honorable Mention

The Oregonian (Portland, Ore.)

Portfolio A

 

 

Category 5B: Newspapers with circulations between 160,001 and 240,000

 

First Place

Newark Star-Ledger

Portfolio A

Comments: “Much ado, then nothing” is brilliant; consistently puts out interesting, eye-catching headlines that should make their readers stop and think — or, at the very least, giggle.

 

Second Place

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Portfolio A

Comments: A great group of entries, all creative and concise and all giving the reader ample reason to dive into the story; inventive and playful; inviting, with appropriate tone and interest.

 

 

Category 5C: Newspapers with circulations between 80,001 and 160,000

 

First Place

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, Ill.)

Portfolio A

Comments: These headlines do what they’re supposed to do, and do it with

panache — grab the reader’s eye and make him want to know what’s going

on. They come from all over the paper. “GI Joe” is a home run, as is “Village people.” Nor do the headline writers shy away from sentiment when it’s needed, as in the “quilt” story.

 

Second Place

Omaha World-Herald

Portfolio A

Comments: A great variety of entertaining headlines. These writers give even the smallest story their best shot.

 

Third Place

Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Va.)

Portfolio A

Comments: So much good stuff going on here, and the tone of the wordplay is just right. Photo makes “A Chance in Hell” easy for the reader to parse, “Beehive” headline is just plain fun, as is “Betty White” and “Endless Bummer.” And “Death stalks” conveys the sense of dread the fine story deserves.

 

Honorable Mention

Detroit News

Portfolio A

Comments: Another fine selection of work that spans all sections of the paper. A favorite was “Steeplechase, then the moon” which played perfectly off the art.

 

 

Category 5D: Newspapers with circulations below 80,000

 

First Place

Wichita Eagle

Portfolio A

Comments: The Eagle’s staff did an outstanding job on a variety of stories. “Middle of nowhere, center of everything” combines two contrasting thoughts in an interesting, clever and informative way. “Desperation is the only thing growing” works perfectly with the main photo on the page and captures the essence of the story. “Bloated ‘New Year’s Eve’ drops the ball” and “Russell Brand’s ‘Arthur’ leaves viewers thinking ‘No Moore’” are both examples of smart movie-review heds that work on two levels.

 

 

Category 5E: Non-newspapers

 

First Place

Playboy magazine

Portfolio A

Comments: Especially liked the playfulness of the Playboy entries and surprised by the variety of topics covered in that magazine.

 

Second Place

Scouting magazine

Portfolio A

 

 

Category 5F: Online

 

First Place

Today.com

Portfolio A

 

 

Category 5G: Students

 

First Place

Daily Tar Heel (University of North Carolina)

Portfolio A

Comments: These headlines work with visual presentation to draw in readers and communicate the news with accuracy and engagement. There are some real gems here, such as “Gymnastics Injuries Harden Diamond” and “#Winning.” Overall, a solid portfolio.

 

Second Place

Kentucky Kernel (University of Kentucky)

Portfolio A

Comments: This student paper obviously produces consistently interesting and engaging headlines. Really love “Geaux Fish.” If that headline doesn’t get you to read a story, I don’t know what will.

 

Third Place

Daily Orange (Syracuse University)

Portfolio A

Comments: A nice variety that smoothly assembles wordplay without straining to make it work.

 

————– 2012 —————-

INDIVIDUALS

 

Category 1A: Newspapers, circulations above 240,001

 

First Place

Frank Christlieb

Dallas Morning News

Comments: Inviting, full headlines that didn’t rely too heavily on tired wordplay. “On  the trail, Bush’s name dropped — almost entirely” was one of the judges’ favorite headline of the year. The simplicity of the Armstrong hed was perfect.

 

Second Place

Laura Dominick

Los Angeles Times

 

Third Place

Colin Powers

The Oregonian

 

Honorable Mention

Peter Blair

The New York Times

 

Honorable Mention

Brian Cleveland

The Washington Post

 

 

Category 1B: Newspapers, circulations 160,001-240,000

 

First Place

Jacob Muselmann

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Comments: The heads tell a story on their own, but the decks provide further context for anyone scanning the page. “StairMaster to heaven” is precisely the headline needed to complete a story about the convergence of faith and fitness. The writer’s ability to join the worlds of weddings and war in “Forever holding their peace” is also admirable.

 

Second Place

Brittney Davies

Newark Star-Ledger

 

Third Place

Marianne Tamburro

Newark Star-Ledger

 

Honorable Mention

Paul Sawyer

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

 

 

Category 1C: Newspapers, circulations 80,001-160,000

 

First Place

Rich Mills

Omaha World-Herald

Comments: Rich’s headlines are notable for their playful intelligence. “The plot thins” and “Principal plays bracket buster” both put twists on well-known phrases to cleverly and accurately sum up the story. “No brakes, but his horn is working” goes perfectly with the photo and is another example of Rich’s dexterity with words.

 

Second Place

Brian French

The Virginian-Pilot

Comments: The headlines display a great grasp of tone, from the serious to the funny and quirky. Their conversational nature makes them inviting, and the risks some of them take are well worth it.

 

Honorable Mention

Don Frost

Detroit News

Comments: “Order your pad thai on iPad” makes the reader smile while conveying the story. “Kraft’s snack division name is a mouthful” has the reader thinking “Hey, I would like to know more.”

 

 

Category 1D: Newspapers, circulations below 80,000

 

First Place

Michael Roehrman

Wichita Eagle

Comments: Good, smart headlines that don’t bludgeon the reader with their cleverness. “Together, they’re 60” piques the imagination, flawlessly playing with the photo to pull readers in. Great fun!

 

Second Place

Sushant Sagar

POLITICO

 

Third Place

Peter Parisi

The Washington Times

 

 

Category 2: Non-newspapers

 

First Place

James Tehrani

Workforce Management

Business and workplace copy can prove challenging for headline writers, and James rose to the challenge. His headlines are engaging and clever, without resorting to a groan-inducing level of wordplay.

 

 

Category 3: Online

 

First Place

Caroline Que

Richmond BizSense

Comments: Witty wordplay gets your attention. Ms. Que cleverly tied the bikini headline to the accompanying photo. She a;sp managed to write a “Yes, Virginia” headline that

a) wasn’t about Christmas and b) was addressed to the entire state of Virginia.

 

Second Place

David Fuller

Winnipeg Free Press

Comments: Snug! Compelling! Funny!

 

Third Place

Chris Nigrin

Omaha World-Herald

Comments: “Sex, booze, Bali” is eye-catching. The poignant human-interest story about the car buff gets a straightforward headline that is neither snarky nor trying too hard to be clever. “In the mood for love” alongside the snarling leopard shows the value of tying headlines and art together.

 

Honorable Mention

Jill Reed

Orange County Register

Comments: These are what food headlines should be: Breezy, with an ear for the language and a light hand on the wordplay.

 

Honorable Mention

James Tehrani

Workforce Management

Comments: It’s hard to make management/human-resources topics interesting — just read your company’s employee manual. These get your attention.

 

 

Category 4: Students

 

First Place

Dana Meredith

Dallas Morning News (internship)

Comments: Good headlines, like good music, don’t rely on the same riffs or notes for every song. Every headline in this entry is fresh. All in all, this entry is an excellent demonstration of headline writing.

 

Second Place

Courtney Pitts

Minneapolis Star Tribune (internship)

 

Third Place

Matt Rooney

Laramie Community College

 

 

 

STAFFS

 

Category 5A: Newspapers, circulations above 240,001

 

First Place

Dallas Morning News

Portfolio A

Comments: A very nice mix of heds, all clever without being too punny. It’s clear the copy desk has a deep understanding of Dallas’ culture, mirroring it with headlines that are at times glamorous, slyly opinionated, funny and — of course — a little bit country.

 

Second Place

Los Angeles Times

Portfolio A

 

 

Category 5B: Newspapers, circulations 160,001-240,000

 

First Place

Newark Star-Ledger

Portfolio A

Comments: The judges unanimously agreed that this was a really strong group of headlines. They’re easy to grasp quickly and don’t try too hard with a pun that doesn’t quite work. Heds this sophisticated make us want to read the stories. The portfolio was strengthened by the mix of story types, and the tone of the heads matched the articles well, being humorous when appropriate and somber as merited.

 

Second Place

San Francisco Chronicle

Portfolio A

 

 

Category 5C: Newspapers, circulations 80,001-160,000

 

First Place

Omaha World-Herald

Portfolio A

Comments: All these headlines have a wonderful and sly sense of humor. They don’t beat the reader over the head with groaners or the easy joke, and they also tell the story in an engaging fashion. And they are wonderfully executed (too often you see headlines that try way too hard — and fall short — at making some sort of wordplay work).

 

 

Category 5D: Newspapers, circulations below 80,000

 

First Place

POLITICO

Portfolio A

Comments: Writing creative and interesting headlines about government and bureaucracy is not easy, but these succeed admirably. Spritely, mercurial twists and turns delight on many different levels.

 

Second Place

The Wichita Eagle

Portfolio A

 

 

Category 5E: Non-newspapers

 

First Place

Workforce Management/MediaTec Publishing Inc.

Portfolio A

Comments: The strong roster of headline writers at Workforce Management/MediaTec Publishing Inc. makes headline writing appear easy. They consistently write headlines that are playful, yet serious enough to not distract from the tone of their respective stories.

 

Second Place

Scouting magazine

Portfolio A

Comments: These headlines offer an intriguing first taste of each article. Some of them seem like low-hanging fruit, but others elevate the package as a whole.

 

 

Category 5F: Online

 

First Place

Omaha World-Herald

Portfolio A

Comments: The headline about the woman who had a $90,000 annual salary and still stole gets your attention — and makes you angry even before you read the story. “Dead zombies, Nebraska bullets” is punchy in the best way. The headline for the feature about the oldest resident finds a clever way of quantifying how old she is; the headline writer mined the story for a detail that would get the reader’s attention.

 

Second Place

The Wichita Eagle

Portfolio A

Comments: These headlines indicate that the Eagle’s online headline-writing style is closely aligned with the newspaper’s: sweetly snarky, like a good friend, and concise.

 

 

Category 5G: Students

 

First Place

Daily Tar Heel (University of North Carolina)

Portfolio A

Comments: This entry was the best of the lot because of two strong headlines and three solid ones. Great heads to go with eye-popping designs.

 

Second Place

The Daily Bruin (University of California, Los Angeles)

Portfolio A

 

Third Place

The Charger Bulletin (University of New Haven)

Portfolio A

 

Honorable Mention

The South End (Wayne State University)

Portfolio A

2013

The complete list of winners, along with judges comments, is below. Click on the title of the entry category to view a PDF of all the honored headlines in that category.

 

1A – 200+, INDIVIDUAL

1: Jim Webster, The Washington Post

The hedlines in this entry were a delight to read. “It’s enough to make anyone anti-pasta” is perhaps the best hed I’ve ever seen on a negative dining review. The wordplay throughout the entry is fantastic

2: Kevin Leung, Los Angeles Times

This entry had a really nice mix of heds. Some features, some harder news, a 1-column offering. I particularly enjoyed “wokking encyclopedia.

3: Cass Peterson, The New York Times

The tone was just right on this batch of heds. “G’Day From Bushwick” was a personal favorite.

Honorable mentions: Laura Dominick, Los Angeles Times

Jim McNett, The Oregonian

 

1B – 100-200, INDIVIDUAL

1: Rich Mills, Omaha World-Herald

The judges found this to be the most well-rounded headline collection, as each hed was engaging. The first one, by suggesting that a seemingly random date in 2036 is less interesting than it used to be, actually makes the reader wonder why it’s less interesting or why it was ever interesting in the first place. Wordplay was solid with “peanut butter/lid” and “robbery/hold up” combinations. Tight hed counts on a few of these further showed the editor’s skills.

2: Marianne Tamburro, The Star-Ledger of Newark

This entry was a strong overall package. “Breaking the sound barrier,” about a school tutorial for deaf students, was a clever way to convey a story about overcoming obstacles. “A joyful tokin’ of their appreciation,” about customers anticipating Colorado’s new marijuana law, was just wonderful and worked greatly with the photo of the merchant in the tie-dyed T-shirt. “Tanning mom basks in glow of legal victory.” Not only did this hed deliver the goods factually and cleverly, but was written in a tight one column. Not an easy task.

3: Tim Sacco, Omaha World-Herald

This entry had a great diversity: news, sports, columns, features and even a brief. “To build a better life, he first built a better him” is a wonderful hed, and the deck just made it better. The “eggnog” and “wedding party” are fun without getting in the way of the story.

Honorable mentions: Tom Justice, The Virginian-Pilot

Courtney Pitts Mattern, Omaha World-Herald

Brittney Davies, The Star-Ledger of Newak

 

1C – 0-100, INDIVIDUAL

1: Peter Donahue, Providence Journal

Hands down, this entry was the unanimous winner. It was sort of a contest to describe the most favorite headline, there’s this one … and this one … and yes, what about this one? And isn’t that just brilliant. Wish I had written that one. You get the idea. Try it at home.

2: Andy Goodwin, Politico

Each headline definitely captures the tone and mood of the story. There are strong nuances here with a touch of emotions and allusions.

3: Michael Roehrman, Wichita Eagle

This headline writer really knows the art of headline writing. He/she has successfully resisted the easy over-the-top puns, but just as successfully taken familiar phrases and turned them into gems by engaging in delightful word play.

Honorable mention: Juliette Beaulieu, Shaw Media

This headline writer nailed the clever connection of words in this entry. In seven words, the writer summed up a complicated legal story (“Anybody home? If so, more prison risk” ) The wordplay in “Shear Delight” perfectly linked the photos and story, capturing the spirit of the event.

 

2 – NON-NEWSPAPER, INDIVIDUAL

1: Hugh Garvey, Playboy

The food headlines are (sorry) just delicious, showing imagination and range and complementing great page design. The group leverages television (“Prawn Star”) rock ‘n’ roll (“New Oyster Cult”) visual art (“Still Life.”) and municipal government (“Port Authority”). And “Next Pig Thing” is delightfully fun – the right amount of silly. “The Revolution will be Vaporized” was an effective pop counterculture reference.

2: James Tehrani, MediaTec Publishing

There’s simple goodness in “Trustworthiness of Truthiness.” (Somewhere Stephen Colbert is smiling.) The double entendre in “A Beef with Jerky” snaps satisfyingly.

3: Brooke Smith, Benefits Canada (Rogers Publishing)

“Spreading the Health” twists a phrase nicely. And “How to Win Members” would make Dale Carnegie grin with appreciation.

 

3 – ONLINE, INDIVIDUAL

1: Gael Fashingbauer Cooper, Today.com

“Twerk or treat” is funny, sassy, spot-on, snappy, and easy to understand. I didn’t have to stop and figure it out. This headline made me want to read the story.

2: Caroline Que, Richmond BizSense

3: David Fuller, Winnipeg Free Pres

 

4 – STUDENT, INDIVIDUAL

Honorable mention: Kayla Overbey, The University Daily Kansan

 

5A – 200+, STAFF

1: San Francisco Chronicle

This entry plays on words that cleverly conveyed what the story is about — “Women advised to find better half who does 50%” and “We’re in a state of optimism” — not just puns for puns’ sake. Heads like “The naked and the wed” make the reader smile all the way into the deck: “Couple’s nude S.F. wedding ceremony comes off without a stitch.”

2: The Wall Street Journal

3: The Dallas Morning News (Portfolio A)

Honorable: Los Angeles Times (Portfolio A)

5B – 100-200, STAFF

1: The Virginian-Pilot

The Manti Teo hed reflected what most of us were probably thinking, as did the movie review for “The Lone Ranger.” The FGCU hed was a superb example of playing off the art, as was “Pig wheels keep on turnin’,” which made me laugh out loud (in a good way).

2: The Detroit News

This entry did what a group entry should do: highlight the depth of talent on the copy desk. A banner hed, hard news heds, a sports hed, feature heds, a column hed. Six columns. One column. Every one was solid, some were great, and all invited me into the story. My two favorites epitomize the range of this entry.

3: The Washington Post Express

 

5C – 0-100, STAFF

1: Daily Herald

The entries are solid headlines that dig into the heart of the content and context without going over the top of taste and sensibility. The writers did a great job of stepping back from the stories to write conversational headlines with witty wordplay that hooks the readers’ attention. The headlines excel at evoking emotions that match the tone of the articles. Every one is a winner.

2: Politico

Writing clever and creative headlines for hard news stories is an advanced skill, one to be treasured and recognized. This collection of headlines exhibits deeply nuanced writing and thinking, each one loaded with information.

3: Wichita Eagle

This newspaper consistently writes creative headlines that should draw in readers – whether it’s just a twist on facts – oil and water mix – or a rhyming feature — menu over venue. Each is a delight to read.

 

5D – NON-NEWSPAPER, STAFF

Honorable mention: Playboy

 

5E – ONLINE, STAFF

1: NPR

These headlines flowed with great rhythm. The “Exorcist” headline is awesome. It puts this batch up a notch. The Madeline rhyme is sweet and funny, not overdone. Each headline made me want to read the story.

2: Kansas.com (Wichita Eagle)

3: NBC News Digital

 

5F – STUDENT, STAFF

1: The Daily Tar Heel

This collection of professional-quality headlines shows excellent work in opinion, features and sports. The rape editorial headline is arresting and resonant. The lacrosse headline — “Overtime and overdue” — is catchy and appropriately celebratory. “Kansas City Calamity” expresses the agony of defeat through the power of rhyme. “He came, he saw, he stole Christmas” is a stroke of genius, as perfect as a headline can be.

2: Baylor University

“Well-rounded for squares” plays nicely off the square peg-round hole phrase. “PETA hypocrisy gets our goat” doesn’t miss a beast, or beat. And “Me My Selfie and I” references a major trend and a famous word of 2013.

3: Laramie County Community College

“Catch a Neighbor by the Tow” brightly conjures up the singsong “eenie meenie” rhyme. “Error … Reboot” is smile inducing and apropos for our computer-dominated everything. The Hansel and Gretel taking candy head shows it’s no wonder these kids got into trouble – they never listened to their parents.

 

2013 WINNERS

ACES announced the winners of its 2013 headline contest during the opening session of the 18th annual conference in Las Vegas.

Winning headlines were published in 2013.

The complete list of winners, along with judges comments, is below. Click on the title of the entry category to view a PDF of all the honored headlines in that category.

 

1A – 200+, INDIVIDUAL

1: Jim Webster, The Washington Post

The hedlines in this entry were a delight to read. “It’s enough to make anyone anti-pasta” is perhaps the best hed I’ve ever seen on a negative dining review. The wordplay throughout the entry is fantastic

2: Kevin Leung, Los Angeles Times

This entry had a really nice mix of heds. Some features, some harder news, a 1-column offering. I particularly enjoyed “wokking encyclopedia.

3: Cass Peterson, The New York Times

The tone was just right on this batch of heds. “G’Day From Bushwick” was a personal favorite.

Honorable mentions: Laura Dominick, Los Angeles Times

Jim McNett, The Oregonian

 

1B – 100-200, INDIVIDUAL

1: Rich Mills, Omaha World-Herald

The judges found this to be the most well-rounded headline collection, as each hed was engaging. The first one, by suggesting that a seemingly random date in 2036 is less interesting than it used to be, actually makes the reader wonder why it’s less interesting or why it was ever interesting in the first place. Wordplay was solid with “peanut butter/lid” and “robbery/hold up” combinations. Tight hed counts on a few of these further showed the editor’s skills.

2: Marianne Tamburro, The Star-Ledger of Newark

This entry was a strong overall package. “Breaking the sound barrier,” about a school tutorial for deaf students, was a clever way to convey a story about overcoming obstacles. “A joyful tokin’ of their appreciation,” about customers anticipating Colorado’s new marijuana law, was just wonderful and worked greatly with the photo of the merchant in the tie-dyed T-shirt. “Tanning mom basks in glow of legal victory.” Not only did this hed deliver the goods factually and cleverly, but was written in a tight one column. Not an easy task.

3: Tim Sacco, Omaha World-Herald

This entry had a great diversity: news, sports, columns, features and even a brief. “To build a better life, he first built a better him” is a wonderful hed, and the deck just made it better. The “eggnog” and “wedding party” are fun without getting in the way of the story.

Honorable mentions: Tom Justice, The Virginian-Pilot

Courtney Pitts Mattern, Omaha World-Herald

Brittney Davies, The Star-Ledger of Newak

 

1C – 0-100, INDIVIDUAL

1: Peter Donahue, Providence Journal

Hands down, this entry was the unanimous winner. It was sort of a contest to describe the most favorite headline, there’s this one … and this one … and yes, what about this one? And isn’t that just brilliant. Wish I had written that one. You get the idea. Try it at home.

2: Andy Goodwin, Politico

Each headline definitely captures the tone and mood of the story. There are strong nuances here with a touch of emotions and allusions.

3: Michael Roehrman, Wichita Eagle

This headline writer really knows the art of headline writing. He/she has successfully resisted the easy over-the-top puns, but just as successfully taken familiar phrases and turned them into gems by engaging in delightful word play.

Honorable mention: Juliette Beaulieu, Shaw Media

This headline writer nailed the clever connection of words in this entry. In seven words, the writer summed up a complicated legal story (“Anybody home? If so, more prison risk” ) The wordplay in “Shear Delight” perfectly linked the photos and story, capturing the spirit of the event.

 

2 – NON-NEWSPAPER, INDIVIDUAL

1: Hugh Garvey, Playboy

The food headlines are (sorry) just delicious, showing imagination and range and complementing great page design. The group leverages television (“Prawn Star”) rock ‘n’ roll (“New Oyster Cult”) visual art (“Still Life.”) and municipal government (“Port Authority”). And “Next Pig Thing” is delightfully fun – the right amount of silly. “The Revolution will be Vaporized” was an effective pop counterculture reference.

2: James Tehrani, MediaTec Publishing

There’s simple goodness in “Trustworthiness of Truthiness.” (Somewhere Stephen Colbert is smiling.) The double entendre in “A Beef with Jerky” snaps satisfyingly.

3: Brooke Smith, Benefits Canada (Rogers Publishing)

“Spreading the Health” twists a phrase nicely. And “How to Win Members” would make Dale Carnegie grin with appreciation.

 

3 – ONLINE, INDIVIDUAL

1: Gael Fashingbauer Cooper, Today.com

“Twerk or treat” is funny, sassy, spot-on, snappy, and easy to understand. I didn’t have to stop and figure it out. This headline made me want to read the story.

2: Caroline Que, Richmond BizSense

3: David Fuller, Winnipeg Free Pres

 

4 – STUDENT, INDIVIDUAL

Honorable mention: Kayla Overbey, The University Daily Kansan

 

5A – 200+, STAFF

1: San Francisco Chronicle

This entry plays on words that cleverly conveyed what the story is about — “Women advised to find better half who does 50%” and “We’re in a state of optimism” — not just puns for puns’ sake. Heads like “The naked and the wed” make the reader smile all the way into the deck: “Couple’s nude S.F. wedding ceremony comes off without a stitch.”

2: The Wall Street Journal

3: The Dallas Morning News (Portfolio A)

Honorable: Los Angeles Times (Portfolio A)

5B – 100-200, STAFF

1: The Virginian-Pilot

The Manti Teo hed reflected what most of us were probably thinking, as did the movie review for “The Lone Ranger.” The FGCU hed was a superb example of playing off the art, as was “Pig wheels keep on turnin’,” which made me laugh out loud (in a good way).

2: The Detroit News

This entry did what a group entry should do: highlight the depth of talent on the copy desk. A banner hed, hard news heds, a sports hed, feature heds, a column hed. Six columns. One column. Every one was solid, some were great, and all invited me into the story. My two favorites epitomize the range of this entry.

3: The Washington Post Express

 

5C – 0-100, STAFF

1: Daily Herald

The entries are solid headlines that dig into the heart of the content and context without going over the top of taste and sensibility. The writers did a great job of stepping back from the stories to write conversational headlines with witty wordplay that hooks the readers’ attention. The headlines excel at evoking emotions that match the tone of the articles. Every one is a winner.

2: Politico

Writing clever and creative headlines for hard news stories is an advanced skill, one to be treasured and recognized. This collection of headlines exhibits deeply nuanced writing and thinking, each one loaded with information.

3: Wichita Eagle

This newspaper consistently writes creative headlines that should draw in readers – whether it’s just a twist on facts – oil and water mix – or a rhyming feature — menu over venue. Each is a delight to read.

 

5D – NON-NEWSPAPER, STAFF

Honorable mention: Playboy

 

5E – ONLINE, STAFF

1: NPR

These headlines flowed with great rhythm. The “Exorcist” headline is awesome. It puts this batch up a notch. The Madeline rhyme is sweet and funny, not overdone. Each headline made me want to read the story.

2: Kansas.com (Wichita Eagle)

3: NBC News Digital

 

5F – STUDENT, STAFF

1: The Daily Tar Heel

This collection of professional-quality headlines shows excellent work in opinion, features and sports. The rape editorial headline is arresting and resonant. The lacrosse headline — “Overtime and overdue” — is catchy and appropriately celebratory. “Kansas City Calamity” expresses the agony of defeat through the power of rhyme. “He came, he saw, he stole Christmas” is a stroke of genius, as perfect as a headline can be.

2: Baylor University

“Well-rounded for squares” plays nicely off the square peg-round hole phrase. “PETA hypocrisy gets our goat” doesn’t miss a beast, or beat. And “Me My Selfie and I” references a major trend and a famous word of 2013.

3: Laramie County Community College

“Catch a Neighbor by the Tow” brightly conjures up the singsong “eenie meenie” rhyme. “Error … Reboot” is smile inducing and apropos for our computer-dominated everything. The Hansel and Gretel taking candy head shows it’s no wonder these kids got into trouble – they never listened to their parents.

 

 

————— 2014 WINNERS —————-

 

1A – 200+, INDIVIDUAL
1: Steve Eames, Los Angeles Times

“From narrow, one-column heads to two-word hammer heads and in the specs in-between, the winner is clever yet clear. The wordplay works on the surface and secondary levels while remaining intriguing. It’s a tricky balance to maintain, but the writer does so in admirable fashion.”

2: Mike Davis, Los Angeles Times

“Strong label heads dominated this sports-oriented entry. ‘Free range chicanery,’ ‘He’ll play it by Erie’ (about LeBron James’ return to Cleveland) and ‘Twisted Assister’ — all of them grabbed attention while fully describing the thrust of the stories.

3: Kevin Leung, Los Angeles Times

“‘NRA says never mind, carry on’ is a thing of beauty. Easily one of my favorite headlines of the year.

“‘Gay marriage may tie GOP in knots’ worked wonderfully on multiple levels,” said another judge. “‘She’s a mother hen to Ducks,’ about an oral surgeon who dotes on a hockey team, was another treat written in a 1-column spec.”

1B – 100-200, INDIVIDUAL
1: Cameron Carlow, Omaha World-Herald

One judge wrote, “I liked every headline in this entry. Each one was clever and smart, relying on relevant wordplay where some might fall back on puns. Each word is important, well-chosen, and in many cases does more than one job.” Another judge wrote, “When I read the headlines in this entry, I knew this was the entry everyone else was going to have to beat. They couldn’t.”

2: Marianne Tamburro, NJ Advance Media

3: Holley Simmons, The Washington Post Express

One judge wrote, “These headlines are witty and smart—enticing the reader to read on.”

Honorable mention: Lori McCue, The Washington Post Express

1C – 0-100, INDIVIDUAL
1: Joe Berkery, Philadelphia Daily News

“Consistently great headlines in a tight tabloid count — sometimes just two words. They’re absolutely dead-on in conveying what the story is about (‘Skid Row’ is about a multi-car pileup; ‘Police Navidad’ is about a cop who helps out special-needs children at Christmastime), while employing clever wordplay.”

2: Peter Donahue, The Providence Journal

“Wordplay is just one tool in this elegant headline writer’s tool belt. We liked ‘New Mums in Waiting at the Nursery’ and ‘The Road to Eating on the Run Has Too Many Forks,’ but were truly in awe of the carefully chosen two words — ‘Glowing Revue’ — on a story about a jack-o’-lantern display.”

3: Peter Donahue, The Providence Journal

Honorable mention: Drew McQuade, Philadelphia Daily News

2 – NON-NEWSPAPER, INDIVIDUAL
Honorable mention: James Tehrani, MediaTec Publishing

3 – ONLINE, INDIVIDUAL
1: 1F. Gael Fashingbauer Cooper, NBCUniversal

“‘Love is in the Air’ goes perfectly with the cloud photo (if you can sing the headline, the reader will get hooked). … ‘Here’s the Kicker’ works on dual levels.”

2: Rick Schindler, NBCUniversal

3: David Fuller, Winnipeg Free Press

4 – STUDENT, INDIVIDUAL
No winners.

5A – 200+, STAFF
1: The Washington Post

“A consistently well-crafted group of headlines, pushed to the top by three undeniable gems:

The tight-count ‘Word on the tweet: A born identity’ is a fun and crafty cloak-and-dagger play. ‘Take reservations off the table and diners become waiters’ had us pulling up our chairs, ready for the waiter … oh, wait. And ‘A legend built of barbs and Botox’ is a wonderfully bold obit hed, as brassy as its subject.”

2: The New York Times

“Professional and smart work throughout. Concise: ‘Rounding up suspects, Pakistan charges a baby.’ ​Lyrical: ‘With Giants in Series, One Rock Song Goes On and On and On and On.’ And very much to the point: ‘Before the Ink Dries on Rules, Soldiers Rush for Tattoos.’ ”

3: Newsday

“A joy to read: ‘Ban on nudity is accepted, barely’ and ‘This “Family” enjoys corn on the macabre’ ”

5B – 100-200, STAFF
1. Omaha World-Herald

“In this extremely evenly matched category, one of the judges put it best by saying the winning headlines spoke to him. They were consistently strong and creative, showing an ability to craft a good turn of phrase on news stories without reaching, and even mixing in a winning sports headline: ‘Kyle Kinman only starts with K’s.’ We loved ‘Capitol’s keeper says painstaking restoration of vintage chairs will pay off in the end//How much? You may want to sit down.’ ”

2. The Washington Post Express

“This entry also wowed the judges with gems like ‘Bread your wings and fry’ and ‘Ain’t nobody got lime for that.’ ”

3. NJ Advance Media

“Favorite offerings were ‘How’d it go for Lynch at Media Day? Don’t ask’ and ‘It’s a marvelous night for a moon glance.’ ”

5C – 0-100, STAFF
1. Politico

“The winning entry made a strong statement with effective wordplay that never crossed over into groaner territory. Its editors made great use of generous specs by writing jump heads that would make readers want to go back and take a story from the top if they hadn’t already. Cases in point: ‘Uber Rear-Ended by Major Public Relations Crisis,’ ‘Congress Burdened by an Attention-to-Deficits Disorder’ and ‘Popularity Fading, Obama to Put on Blue-State Shoes.’ ”

2. The Wichita Eagle

“These editors also turned in several grabbers, including ‘Missing painting leaves bare spot’ and ‘No middle ground when shaping up for crop tops.’ ”

3. Winnipeg Free Press

“This entry made us smile with ‘Cirque du So L’il’ and ‘Minding their pees and queues.’ ”

5D – NON-NEWSPAPER, STAFF
1: Human Capital Media

“By suggesting that someone knows more about you than you know about yourself, ‘You, Biased? No, It’s Your Brain’ is the type of headline that makes you do a double-take. It sparks your curiosity and dares you to jump into the story to find out what could be going on inside your brain. ‘Duck’s Dynasty’ captured the light feeling of the photo and a profile story. It works even if you’ve somehow managed to not hear of the show (the key to a successful pop culture reference in a headline).

5E – ONLINE, STAFF
1: 2U. NBCUniversal

“There’s lots of refreshing whimsy. ‘Purls of wisdom’ and ‘Cocoa Chanel’ use perfectly placed puns. The Elvis headline is spot-on, and points for going beyond the usual King puns.”

2: 5U. NPR

5F – STUDENT, STAFF
1: The Daily Tar Heel, University of North Carolina

“It was easy to tell from this entry what the biggest story of the year was at the university. Time and again, the paper handled the student-athlete scandal not with tired cliches, but with straightforward, conversational headlines that draw the reader in. ‘How did UNC get here?’ is the rare question headline that works. ‘87 Percent Said No’ is a commanding headline that immediately shows the gravity of the apparent morale problem at a North Carolina high school. It lets the survey numbers from the story do the talking. And “Along Came Molly” makes an effective contrast with the reporter’s story; the hed references a lighthearted film while the report about a popular drug strikes a darker tone.

2: Columbia Missourian, University of Missouri

“The ‘Sam: I know who I am’ headline stood out with its clever Dr. Seuss play.

3: Laramie County Community College

 

————— 2015 WINNERS —————-

 

HeadlineBook_coverFor the first time, the winners were announced with the presentation of a commemorative booklet to members in attendance at the banquet.

The 48-page, full-color booklet features the headlines from every portfolio placing first, second or third in the contest. Distribution of the booklet at the conference was sponsored by The Associated Press Stylebook.

“In the past, we’ve just featured the winning headlines in a slideshow during the awards presentation,” said Nick Jungman, ACES executive committee member and contest chair. “With the booklet, we hope people will take the opportunity to study the winning headlines and understand what makes them great. We also hope the booklet will be a resource for aspiring headlines writers everywhere.”

The booklet will be available for sale on ACES’ website, copydesk.org, following the conference. The cost is $10 per copy, plus postage.

Individual winners in professional categories won between $75 and $300 and winners in student categories won between $50 and $125. The complete list of winners and a sampling of headlines from first-place portfolios are below.

2015 HEADLINE CONTEST WINNERS

STAFF AWARDS

FrondsWithBenefitsNewspapers, circulation 200,001 and larger

• 1st, The Dallas Morning News

• 2nd, The Washington Post (Portfolio A)

• 3rd, The Washington Post (Portfolio B)

• Honorable mention,
The New York Times

• Honorable mention,
San Francisco Chronicle

 Newspapers, circulation 100,001-200,000

• 1st, New Jersey Advance Media (The Star-Ledger, Portfolio A)

• 2nd, Omaha World-Herald (Portfolio A)

• 3rd, Omaha World-Herald (Portfolio B)

Newspapers, circulation 100,000 and smaller

• 1st, Philadelphia Daily News

• 2nd, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, Illinois)

• 3rd, The Wichita Eagle

 Non-newspaper publications

• No places were awarded

 Online publications

• 1st, NPR

• 2nd, NBC Universal (including TODAY.com)

• 3rd, Law360

Honorable mention, The Wichita Eagle

 Student publications

• 1st, The Daily Tar Heel, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

• 2nd, Wingspan, Laramie County (Wyoming) Community College

• 3rd, The Baylor Lariat, Baylor University

 INDIVIDUAL AWARDS

 Newspapers, circulation 200,001 and larger

• 1st, David Bowman, Los Angeles Times

• 2nd, Julie Bone, The Washington Post

• 3rd, Jim Webster, The Washington Post

 Newspapers, circulation 100,001-200,000

• 1st, Rich Mills, Omaha World-Herald

• 2nd, Dan Golden, Omaha World-Herald

• 3rd, Jake Arnold, Oregonian Media Group (The Oregonian)

• Honorable mention, Tim Sacco, Omaha World-Herald (Portfolio B)

 Newspapers, circulation 100,000 and smaller

• 1st, Doug Darroch, Philadelphia Daily News

• 2nd, Joe Berkery, Philadelphia Daily News

• 3rd, Peter Donohue, The Providence Journal

 Non-newspaper publications

• 1st, James Tehrani, Human Capital Media’s Workforce magazine

• 2nd, Frannie Sprouls, Human Capital Media

• 3rd, Missy Sheehan, Sheehan Writing & Editing

 Online publications

• 1st, Colin Dwyer, NPR

• No other places were awarded

Student publications

• 1st, Taylor Griffin, The Baylor Lariat, Baylor University

• 2nd, Emma LeGault, The University Daily Kansan, University of Kansas

• No other places were awarded

A SAMPLING OF SOME OF THE HEADLINES FROM FIRST-PLACE PORTFOLIOS

FeedTheirLust They feed their lust,

then bite the dust

 It’s afterlife instead of afterglow for males of rare marsupial species

— Frank Smith, The Dallas Morning News

___________________________________________________________________________________

Egg prices soar as disease ravages hen population

Get ready

to shell

out more

— Marianne Tamburro, New Jersey Advance Media (The Star-Ledger)

___________________________________________________________________________________

 Hello? They’re

 finding a calling

 in the Philippines

 Young workers take better-paying jobs at call centers used by American companies

— David Bowman, Los Angeles Times

___________________________________________________________________________________

Strip club owner dresses down County Board

— Rich Mills, Omaha World-Herald

___________________________________________________________________________________

WHERE THE GUN DON’T SHINE

Arrested man’s attempt to smuggle weapon into jail cell nipped in the butt

— Doug Darroch, Philadelphia Daily News

___________________________________________________________________________________

This Is Not A Parody: An NPR Story About Homemade Vegetable Broth

— Nicole Cohen, NPR

___________________________________________________________________________________